48 Comments

  1. DAVE GALEA
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    I've been using Drywall Screws for about 5 years now in MDF and not one of them snap etc and they are strong

    Reply

  2. stephen guidry
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    i have been installing flooring for 45 years and ive never heard or experienced this damage your speaking of. its miniscule particles of aluminin oxide and your only cutting through it once right ? if someone cant put in a drywall screw without breaking it maby there in the wrong line of work. still i enjoy your viedos brother, keep em comming

    Reply

  3. Jillian Harte
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Love your watch!

    Reply

  4. Moon Raker
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Turn the lights off and cut a piece laminate. You'll get a pretty cool spark show.

    Reply

  5. sirp0p0
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    My mom used drywall screws for everything she makes. Everything. She only used a couple lengths too so people are constantly getting snagged on them. She refuses to listen to me or anyone else about using the right tool for the job.
    She's also a repeat offender at "measure once, cut twice" and she won't wear glasses when cutting. She thinks safety squints are enough. Love her to death but she's dangerous and hard-headed.

    Reply

  6. heriberthuber54
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    There are valid reasons to water down woodglue. Just not in woodworking. For example when making dioramas watered down woodglue is sprayed on for fixating all kinds of loose stuff on the diorama. Works fabulously.

    Reply

  7. wwmilanl
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    About the glue with water, Most probably your friend got confuse with the Gorilla GLUE Polyurethane based that glue it is true that if the area to glue is HUMID will glue better , I do that all the time (spray a little of water on the target area)

    Reply

  8. Stephen kenney
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    I water down glue for MDF edges, it stops the edge from sponging up primer and it can fill in the pores. I wouldn't use it on plywood tho, but maybe there is a good reason he did it.

    Reply

  9. DONALD DUKE
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Plus the double pusher allows you to push through and rip your hand right down the middle.

    Reply

  10. Katsoup98
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Mr. Knecht, I gotta ask what region of the country you're from. I can't exactly place the accent, but I'm thinking Great Lakes or something?

    Reply

  11. A Well Dressed Male Papaya
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Do you not have a riving knife on your tablesaw? That is what is truly the bad thing in this video. ALWAYS USE YOUR RIVING KNIFE PEOPLE!!

    Reply

  12. Paul Frederick
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Whoever thought there was some bad ideas in this video should read the comments. There's some real stinkers in here!

    Reply

  13. Philip Adams
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    When I installed a few Pergo (laminate) floors as I was cutting the flooring on my skill saw, there were sparks, yes sparks coming from wood? Theres metal in there wood.

    Reply

  14. Ken Fullman
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Where did you get those tamper proof screws from? 🙂

    Reply

  15. The Devil
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Microjig is the best thing to push wood through a table saw. And you don't have to buy one. They are easy to make.

    Reply

  16. Todd S
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    As already mentioned, no riving knife. Fix that mistake first!!!!!

    Reply

  17. percival23
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    What was not shown was how much closer your hand will be to the saw blade with the "proper" push stick he recommends. For the record, the single version of that push stick he claims is dangerous comes with some Dewalt table saws and I assume many others. With a kickback guard & riving knife installed (unlike this "safety tips" video)
    …you could argue that the concerns of a kickback should not outweigh the need to keep your hands away from the saw blade as far away as possible.

    Reply

  18. Rich Williams
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Someone recommended putting a couple of coats of watered down glue on the edge, letting it dry some, then gluing the edge with full strength glue.

    Reply

  19. Atelierul 29
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    You broke those screws because you over torqued them…I use them all the time in wood and never broke one…i pre drilled holes in very old and dry oak beams and those screws went all the way in without breaking!

    Reply

  20. Bill Gwilliam
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Personal tips for using a table saw? Never ever stand in line with the blade! The carbide tooth is brazed on, a braze can fail and that tooth will travel like a bullet straight for the operator! Also for efficiency of cutting the blade should ALWAYS be lowered to just above the material to be cut. Also whenever possible use a clear Perspex shield above the blade.

    Reply

  21. Metalbass10000
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    What was the purpose of having the blade so ridiculously high when demonstrating cutting the thin materials in this video? The blade would not be moving at such an elevated upward angle when set at anywhere near an appropriate height for cutting such a thin material.

    Otherwise, very good video, very good information. Even predrilling and waxing the screw, still those are lousy screws in many applications.

    The double push-stick was hilarious!

    Reply

  22. Dean Thomas
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    I've watched four volumes of how not to work wood. Great stuff. Loved the finger point at "chicken foot" "safety" devices. So good to present safety based on physics.

    Reply

  23. Thomas Green
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Thank you for the videos on what not to do, I have yet to see anyone talk about making sure you have adequate power for the tool you are using. the biggest offender is the guy that picks up a cheap extension cord and tries to use it for His tools. the smallest gauge cord you should ever use is no less that 14 guage, and if it is 50 feet or longer you need to go up to a 12 gauge. I have several cords that are 100 foot and all of them are 10 gauge. The reason for this is because of amps. the longer the cord the less amps that are available to the tool. iff you do not give it the right amount of amps, you could ruin the tool. 16 gauge is fine for shop lights but not for tools.

    Reply

  24. WashingtonWebFoot
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    I'm work for a company that builds product from MDO and we use dry wall screws exclusively. Not the same as solid hard wood, of course, but the coarse thread tends to have a stronger hold.

    Reply

  25. TheMozzaok
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    When this guy said he cannot imagine any situation where you would ever need to water down glue, he lost my respect. Either inexperienced or dumb.

    Reply

  26. paul Newman
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Great vid. I’m sure this is what the internet was made for. Not inane videos about z list celebrities.

    Reply

  27. Tag Smyser
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Colin, the proper use for watered down glue is as sizing to help seal end grain and plywood before the actual glue up. I agree not proper use for final glue up. Not an expert just something I saw on a Woodworkers Guild of America video.

    Reply

  28. Becky Fischer
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Regular Gorilla Glue needs to have water used with it so the glue will work. You wet one piece of what you are gluing and put the Gorilla Glue on the other piece. Then put together.

    Reply

  29. Jay 156
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    your "proper push stick" gets your hand too close to the saw for my liking. I use two of those push sticks you say are bad, just not connected like that. that is stupid. I use one in each hand. One to push, one to hold the piece down and against the fence.

    Reply

  30. MrGAMECATCanaveral
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Stop laughing so much. Jeesh. There's nothing funny.

    Reply

  31. Prjndigo
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Listen, bub, there's no metal in laminate flooring outside of the aluminum in the sand. It contains tree bark and floor sweepings.

    Reply

  32. Paul Round
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Anyone who can't see the danger in that ridiculous double push stick really should not be anywhere near a table saw. If you don't understand the table saw and the inherent dangers just leave it alone, one wrong move and your fingers are gone or you have a piece of 3×2 in the face and that will ruin your day for sure.

    Reply

  33. Brisbane Kilarny
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    If the screw is breaking off in the wood, set the driver to a lower setting number on the chuck. This works every time. You can hand check the tightness of the screw and adjust the chuck to a higher number. Do not use the drill setting when putting in screws unless the screws are long and in hardwood or long and not pre-drilled.

    Reply

  34. chainmaillekid
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Titebond says you can dilute the glue with water up to 10% without affecting the strength.

    Reasons to do this would be to increase the open time, or to lower the viscosity, say if you're injecting the glue into a crack.

    You can really go quite a bit more than 10% if some loss of strength is acceptable.

    Reply

  35. I Pinch
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Even if you can screw this black hardent screw in, it will fall apart after several years of use. It happened to my sofa, each screw on one side fell apart into THREE pieces

    Reply

  36. Ian Irwin
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Using that double pusher, if the wood does kick up your hand is positioned flush with the blade and not to one side as with the correct pusher. It's probably LESS safe than using no pusher at all.

    Reply

  37. TGOTR
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    I water down glue for a specific purpose, working with OSB. Don't want it too thin, just enough to spread over the surface, then when it's dry, sand it to get a smoother painting surface.

    Reply

  38. Iceman0219
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    For the drywall screws, I’ve never had one snap on me, granted I’m usually using them in just 2x4s and the like but still never seen anyone be able to snap a decent quality drywall screw, would recommend torquing your drill properly

    Reply

  39. Andrew Denis
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    I had heard people say that about composite deck products several years ago, such as off-brands of Trex-like composite decking, etc. However, I researched composite decking and found out that there is never any sort of metal in any of the non-metal deck products. However, it seems that it has gotten people to shy away from using low cost sources of Ipe, Camaru, Brazillian Teak, etc, which are typically start at about 30% the cost per board-foot of alternate sources of comparably sized boards.

    However, I had not heard that about laminate composite wood flooring, so I just researched it for about 20 minutes, but cannot find any laminate flooring product types or brands where that is a problem, nor any blade or table manufacturers that recommend against cutting using a standard table saw blade due to any sort of metal in them.  I did read about a thin oxide coating on some types for wear resistance, but they and the blade manufacturers do not say you can't or shouldn't cut it using standard table saw blades.

    So, I was wondering where did you read about laminate flooring having "bits of metal in it and you name it", as you noted? Is it something that someone said to you, or do you have a researched source that you can point us to? Obviously, hard fired tiles, hard ceramic tile flooring and such should be cut using a proper tile blade, and things requiring wet saws should be cut on wet saws; but the idea of metal in composite wood floor products is a new one on me.

    Please put up some info/research on that, if you have any. Thanks!

    BTW, that "problem" with those screws happens with many different types of wood screws, including fancy brass, deep deck, etc. You have to properly pre-drill AND drill (i.e. do not over-drill), and also, realize that different types of screws have different shear and other factors, and are often based on trade-offs. The same is true with different types of nails, and is why for certifications and standards rate and recommend certain types of screws and nails for different decking and loading situations. However, that does not mean that you should not use brass or other such screws– just use them where and when they are appropriate. There is torsion, tension and shear rating among different types of screws, and the values generally have trade-offs between each other.

    One last thing, the worst thing about that push stick is that it puts your hand right over and in-lines with the blade, and pushing fairly towards the blade. A real no-no on multiple levels for multiple reasons.

    Reply

  40. William Sevier
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    I use those types of push sticks that you recommend they work great, easy to make and you can make them different sizes for different applications. I have a smaller one for my little Dremel 580 4" Table Saw too.

    Reply

  41. n00baTr00pa
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    On the point about the table saw, you also did happen to have the blade far too proud of the timber to be cut.

    Reply

  42. thedragonreaper
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    Something that always gets me with American table saws is the lack of crown guards and riving knifes here in the UK I check my table saw at work every time that the knife is set correctly to the blade and theirs no immediate damage to the crown guard they stop almost any kind of kick up off wood and reduce kick back risk another piece to add is riving teeth to the back of the guard where their loose below the guard but stop hard just above it to also minimise kick back and a small modification to the rip fence we have as well is a wooden insert that sits parallel inside the fence and goes about half a cm over the blade so when the work is cut it slips away from the saw almost immediately stopping any kind of pinch on the blade when cutting and as for push sticks I make mine from MDF about 8mm to a cm thick for the main reason of any other material such as soft or hardwood or even plastic will get caught in the blade if by accident and either spit out with some serious force or shatter and rip out of your hand where as MDF is hard as it's compressed wood dust and glue but when it hits the blade by mistake the blade just chews right through it like paper again with minimal kick back or ripping out of your hand and always periodically check your blades clean sharp and tight fitted and dull blade can soon stale a chipped blade can stale and fragment bits of blade off and a loosened blade can soon work off and either shatter or fly right out towards you giving you milliseconds to react.

    Reply

  43. Peres
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    You can water the wood before gluing if using PU glue. It will foam the glue.

    Reply

  44. benzracer
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    One, there is no metal mixed in to the substrate for laminate flooring. Two, "watering" glue properly is necessary in some situations, but unless the glue is water based don't use water. Three, that's particle board and don't use a heavy amount of water based glue directly on a rough edge, it will soak up moisture and swell. Four, it's called a clutch. Set it properly and you'll not snap screws. Five, drill a proper pilot hole for the size of screw you're using. If you're going to do it, do it right. Six, set up your table saw properly and you can use a push stick like that (but yes, please not the double. My gripe is that you obviously don't know how to use a table saw and are recommending against a single push stick). The chickens foot as you called it is pretty recommended for thin cuts as it keeps your hand well away from the blade at the end of the cut. Thumbs down and won't be watching any more of your videos.

    Reply

  45. debeeriz
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    good reason to water down glue. to make note pads for writing on instead of loose sheets or for bookbinding, repairing a book that is coming apart

    Reply

  46. IncognitoTorpedo
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    I don't know about letting glue sit on the plywood edge for 15-20 minutes. The plies run in alternate orientation, so only half of it is endgrain– the other half is good wood. Even if letting glue set up on the end grain helps the bond, it will probably hurt the bond on the side grain. Since that is the bulk of your overall bond strength, I think this glue-coating scheme is going to make the overall bond weaker, not stronger. I've never had a bond failure when gluing plywood ends the same way we would glue a normal board.

    Reply

  47. Meridian Herschel
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    You can dilute glue to apply it to end grain BEFORE the proper glueup. It'll soak the glue into the fibers, fill them slightly and thus make it easier to glue end grain.

    Reply

  48. Green Beast
    April 25, 2020 @ 6:50 pm

    A lot of the flooring woods have magnesium carbide in them to make them more scratch resistant. Its bad for cutting tools. After I floored my entire house upstairs and downstairs my saw blade was dead. It was a brand new blade I bought for the job and it barely made it to the finish.

    Reply

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